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How do I … | Digital Education and Innovation

How do I …

Flip an activity or course?

Flipped learning is a pedagogical model where traditional instructional goals for what happens inside and outside of class are reversed and student learning becomes increasingly active. The flipped learning model can be used for a single session or an entire course.

It is strongly recommended that if you are interested in Flipped Learning, you review the DEI Flipped Learning Guide.  The guide provides more detail as to the benefits and challenges of flipped learning as well as means to implement this method through instructional strategies and more.

In addition to the guide, typically, instructors who are flipping aspects of their course, may also find it helpful to become comfortable with the following topics listed below:

How do I record one of my lectures?

How do I make course readings available to students?

How do I use video for short online discussions?

Implement the Collaborative Online International Learning Model?

Collaborative Online International Learning (COIL) is a model for teaching and learning that promotes the development of intercultural competence (the ability to communicate effectively and appropriately with people from other cultures) through a shared online multicultural learning environment.

It is strongly recommended that if you are interested in COIL methods, you review the DEI COIL Workbook. The workbook walks you through the process of finding a partner, establishing relationships and designing and delivering your COIL activity.

Typically instructors who are going to COIL an aspect of their course may also find it helpful to become comfortable with the following topics listed below:

How do I collaborate with others on documents, surveys or spreadsheets?

How do I host a video chat?

How do I host an online meeting?

How do I use video for short online discussions?

Use an open textbook in my class?

Open textbooks are textbooks that have been funded, published, and licensed to be freely used, adapted, and distributed. These books have been reviewed by faculty from a variety of colleges and universities to assess their quality. These books can be downloaded for no cost, or printed at low cost. Using an Open textbook saves students money and allows you the potential to customize your students textbook experience.  While many location offer open resources, a good first place to visit is the Open Textbook Library.

If you don’t find a book that suits your needs, you can always write your own!  The DEI team will put you in touch with the right people to get your started.  In the meantime  keep in mind several other cost saving, student friendly tools for your classroom with the following popular needs.

How do I make course readings available to students?

How do I collaborate with others on documents, surveys or spreadsheets

Make my course accessible?

Accessible course materials are available to all students. When you make accessibility  part of your regular practice your course materials will be ready for each of your students regardless of need.  Some prime examples of accessibility practices include structuring Microsoft Word and PDF documents for screen reader software by using styles, captioning YouTube videos, and using styles when structuring text in Moodle.

To make sure your course site is as accessible as possible, work with one of DEI’s Instructional Designers by emailing: deiteam@umn.edu.

How do I make text documents accessible?

How do I make video accessible?

How do I make Moodle content accessible?

Create better presentations?

“Great presentation slides contain six bullet points and no more than six words per bullet, no wait, make that seven and seven.”

“Engaging presentations are ideally 20 slides at 20 seconds each.”

“The best presentations consist of 10 slides, last 20 minutes and fonts are no smaller than 30 point.”

A quick search for presentation tips on the internet will yield a deluge of rules, tips and tricks like these. Which are right? None of them and all of them. Creating really good presentations can be a tricky thing. All of the above ideas have merit. All of them point to simplifying your message, minimizing all too common misuse of presentation tools and optimizing audience engagement. None of them will always work best. Presentations are unique in every instance, whether face-to-face or online, to students or to peers. Structure your content in any way that works for best for you as long as your content is memorable and scalable. Throughout your creation process keep the following ten general best practices in mind.

Read more about Presentation Best Practices

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